NIKHEF Agenda

Index200320022001200019991998199719961995
Alphabetic list of Speakers

Thursday 3rd January (2002)Thursday 3th January 

Thursday 3th January


15:30UvA
ITFA
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT ITFA

Liouville symmetry in quantum dynamics (link)
A. Maassen van den Brink
(D-Wave Systems, Vancouver)
We consider symmetries, generated by commuta tion with the Liouville superoperator for a quantum system. These are not reduced to Hamiltonian symmetries because the Liouvillian depends on eigenenergy _differences_, which can coincide even in the absence of energy degeneracies. As an example, the correlation functions of a simple Josephson circuit are shown to have cancellation properties not obvious from the Schr"odinger equation, even though the latter is equivalent to the Liouville approach in principle. The new symmetry's wider relevance and its classical counterpart are also discussed.




Monday 7th January (2002)Monday 7th January 

Monday 7th January


14:00Nijmegen
HEFIN
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT HEFIN

Particle correlations in e+e- interactions
Sarka Todorova
(Nijmegen/Praag)
10:00NIKHEF hal
NIKHEF event

Nieuwjaarsreceptie
Nieuwjaarsreceptie




Friday 11th January (2002)Friday 11th January 

Friday 11th January


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

Results from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (link)
Dr. David Wark
(RAL and Sussex University)
Neutrinos were first proposed by Wolfgang Pauli in the 1930's as a "desperate remedy" to the apparent disappearance of energy and momentum in beta decay. In the late 60's another problem arose: the observed flux of neutrinos from the Sun was significantly smaller than predicted. Another "desperate remedy" was proposed - perhaps the neutrinos emitted from the Sun were changing from one type to another before reaching the Earth, and thereby evading the experiments. After 30 years of effort this phenomenon, called neutrino oscillations, has now been experimentally demonstrated. The talk will discuss these experiments, focussing on recent results from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, and talk about the significance and future of this new area of particle physics.




Thursday 17th January (2002)Thursday 17th January 

Thursday 17th January


11:15Z011
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

NIKHEF+CHEAF: Solar Neutrinos - An Overview (link)
Dr J. Bahcall
(Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton)
Seven beautiful experiments (Homestake, Kamiokande, GALLEX, SAGE, GNO, Superkamiokande, and SNO) have detected solar neutrinos. The measured neutrino fluxes and energies are consistent with predictions of standard solar models, when corrections are made for neutrino oscillations. These experiments settle empirically the debate initiated in the middle of the 19th century on how the sun shines. The combined experimental results show that physics beyond the minimal standard electroweak model is occurring. Helioseismological measurements strengthen this inference. All of the neutrino results are well described by simple models of neutrino oscillations. I will summarize the current status of solar neutrino research and review the prospects for discriminating between different neutrino oscillation scenarios with the SNO, KAMLAND, BOREXINO, and ICARUS experiments (background material at: http://www.sns.ias.edu/~jnb.) Note the unusual place: Z011!
15:30UvA, gebouw Euclides
Algemeen Natuur- en Sterrenkunde
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT Algemeen Natuur- en Sterrenkunde

to be aanounced (link)
Prof. Marc Golden
(UvA)




Monday 21st January (2002)Monday 21th January 

Monday 21th January


14:00KUN
HEFIN
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT HEFIN

Substructures and Correlations in High Energy Collisions
A. Giovannini
(Torino)




Thursday 24th January (2002)Thursday 24th January 

Thursday 24th January


15:30UvA
ITFA
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT ITFA

title to be announced (link)
K. Skenderis
(Princeton)




Friday 25th January (2002)Friday 25th January 

Friday 25th January


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

Low-energy searches for physics beyond the Standard Model using atoms and muons
Prof.dr. K. Jungmann
(KVI)




Monday 28th January (2002)Monday 28th January 

Monday 28th January


14:00KUN
HEFIN
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT HEFIN

Inflation and quintessence the physics of cosmic scalar fields
J.W. van Holten
(NIKHEF)




Monday 4th February (2002)Monday 4th February 

Monday 4th February


14:00Nijmegen
HEFIN
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT HEFIN

CP Violation and B Decays
Marcel Merk
(NIKHEF)




Friday 8th February (2002)Friday 8th February 

Friday 8th February


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

Inflation and quintessence (link)
J.W. van Holten
(NIKHEF)
Various recent experiments measuring cosmological parameters indicate the existence of important amounts of dark matter and dark energy in the universe. Cosmic scalar fields could be a source of dark energy. I offer some speculations on the origin of such scalar fields, and show how experimental data can be used to constrain theoretical models.




Wednesday 13th February (2002)Wednesday 13th February 

Wednesday 13th February


16:15Utrecht, St. Nicolaikerk
NIKHEF event

Oratie Paul M. Kooijman
Oratie Paul M. Kooijman
Titel: 'Voorrecht en Plichten'




Thursday 14th February (2002)Thursday 14th February 

Thursday 14th February


15:30Spectrum
NIKHEF event

Jubileum Jan Lefevere
Jubileum Jan Lefevere
16:00KUN
HEFIN
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT HEFIN

Blazars and Pulsars with AMS
Martin Pohl
(CERN/KUN)




Friday 15th February (2002)Friday 15th February 

Friday 15th February


11:15H331/Z011
Landelijk Seminarium Theoretische HEF

Modelling Quark Superconductivity

Full agenda Landelijk Seminarium THEF
Simon Hands
(Swansea University)
The agenda will be provided by the NIKHEF theory group.




Friday 22nd February (2002)Friday 22th February 

Friday 22th February


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

Experimental Investigation into the Two-Photon Width of Charmonium
H Paar
(University of California, San Diego)
I present measurements of the two-photon widths of the charmonium states etac, chic0, and chic2. These results were obtained with the CLEO detector at the Cornell electron-positron collider CESR and are based upon an integrated luminosity of 12.7 /fb obtained at centre-of-mass energies near the Upsilon(4S). The charmonium states have been detected in their decays into KKbarpi and 4pi final states. The results are compared with the expectations from QCD. We avoid the 40\% branching fraction uncertainties and cancel the systematic uncertainties in the measurements by measuring the ratio of the two-photon widths of the chic0 and the chic2. Non-perturbative factors in the QCD calculation also cancel in the ratio and the result has sensitivity to the value of alpha-s.




Friday 1st March (2002)Friday 1th March 

Friday 1th March


11:15Z011
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

How the Web Was Born
Dr James Gillies
(ETT Division CERN)
In 1993 a computer programme called the Mosaic browser transformed the Internet from an academic tool into a telecommunications revolution. Now a household name, the World Wide Web is part of the modern communications landscape with tens of thousands of servers providing information to millions of users. Few people, however, realise that the Web was born at CERN. Still fewer are aware that the Internet's roots can be traced back to laboratories England and the USA, via a packet-switching network in France and a satellite ground station in Norway. The story of the Internet is one of altruistic, international endeavour by academics - far different from the popular myth that it was a military invention. This talk will trace the development of the three ingredients that made the Web possible - networks, hypertext, and personal computers - and it will explain why CERN was a natural place for the Web to develop. About the speaker: James Gillies is Editor of the CERN Courier magazine. He began his career in particle physics, working on the EMC and OPAL experiments at CERN. After a brief stint with the BBC, he joined CERN's communications team as a staff science writer in 1995. He is co-author with Robert Cailliau of the Oxford University Press popular science title 'How the Web was Born'. Note the unusual place. Coffee will be served at around 10:45 hrs in front of Z011. A limited number of copies of the book "How the Web was born" will be offered for sale just before and after the presentation. Only cash payment will be accepted, the price of the book is EUR 15,-.




Tuesday 12th March (2002)Tuesday 12th March 

Tuesday 12th March


16:30KUN
HEFIN
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT HEFIN

Froth across the Universe: the Cosmic Foam as key to the Formation of Structure
Rien van de Weygaert
(Groningen)




Friday 15th March (2002)Friday 15th March 

Friday 15th March


11:15H331/Z011
Landelijk Seminarium Theoretische HEF

The Ekpyrotic Universe and its cyclic extension

Full agenda Landelijk Seminarium THEF
Neil Turok
(Cambridge)
The agenda will be provided by the NIKHEF theory group.




Monday 18th March (2002)Monday 18th March 

Monday 18th March


16:00Nijmegen
HEFIN
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT HEFIN

Large electroweak corrections at TeV-scale linear colliders
Wim Beenakker
(KUN)




Thursday 21st March (2002)Thursday 21th March 

Thursday 21th March


15:30UvA, Plant. Muidergracht
UvA
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT UvA

The Phases of Utlracold Atoms (link)
Prof.dr. H.T.C. Stoof
(Natuurkunde en Sterrenkunde)




Friday 22nd March (2002)Friday 22th March 

Friday 22th March


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

Monte Carlo Event Generation for Future (and Present) Colliders (link)
Thorsten Ohl
(Wuerzburg University)
The matrix element compiler O'Mega constructs optimally factorized expressions for scattering amplitudes with many particles. These expressions are translated into very stable and efficient numerical code for simulation. The extension of the method to color-summed amplitudes is described. O'Mega is designed to work smoothly with the adaptive phase space generator WHIZARD for unweighted event generation. The underlying library VAMP for adaptive multichannel sampling is described.




Monday 25th March (2002)Monday 25th March 

Monday 25th March


11:00Universiteit Utrecht
SAF
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT SAF

Testing double sided Si-strip detectors with infrared laser light
J. Beetz
(UU)




Friday 5th April (2002)Friday 5th April 

Friday 5th April


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

Gamma Ray Bursts
A de Rujula
(CERN)
The best natural accelerators are the ones involved in quasars and GRBs. After decades of observations and scores of theories, we still do not know how they work. But, I shall argue, we now understand quite well how their beams behave, as they make short pulses of gamma rays and long-duration X-ray, optical and radio afterglows. For the afterglows --- on which I shall concentrate --- our understanding, based on the Cannonball model, is extraordinarily simple, precise and successful. GRB's should be accompanied by a pre-glow of very high energy neutrinos and gamma rays, that current or planned detectors may be able to see. The only problem the CB model has, so far, is that it is contrary to staunch orthodox beliefs: the sociology of this subject is interesting per se.
09:00Stadsschouwburg Amsterdam
NIKHEF event

Snaren, Toneelgroep Amsterdam (link)
Snaren, Toneelgroep Amsterdam
'Wetenschap op toneel' NB: start NIET om 09.00 uur.




Saturday 6th April (2002)Saturday 6th April 

Saturday 6th April


09:00Stadsschouwburg Amsterdam
NIKHEF event

Snaren, Toneelgroep Amsterdam (link)
Snaren, Toneelgroep Amsterdam
'Wetenschap op toneel" NB: Start NIET om 9.00 uur.




Friday 12th April (2002)Friday 12th April 

Friday 12th April


Groningen
NNV voorjaarsvergadering

NNV voorjaarsvergadering (link)
NNV voorjaarsvergadering




Tuesday 16th April (2002)Tuesday 16th April 

Tuesday 16th April


11:00H220
NIKHEF SEMINAR

Soft and collinear radiation and factorization in perturbation theory and beyond.
Einan Gardi
(CERN theory group)
Power corrections to differential cross sections in the proximity of a kinematic threshold are analysed in the framework of Dressed Gluon Exponentiation. Exploiting the factorization property of soft and collinear radiation, a large class of radiative corrections which dominate the perturbative expansion in this region is resummed, yielding a renormalization-scale invariant expression for the Sudakov exponent. It is conjectured that factorization applies beyond the perturbative level. Thus information on power corrections can be drawn from the resummed perturbative calculation. The interplay between Sudakov logs and renormalons is clarified, and the necessity to resum the latter whenever power corrections are non-negligible is emphasized. Two examples are discussed. The first is event-shape distributions in the two-jet region, where there is no operator product expansion (OPE), and the second is deep inelastic structure funstions, where the OPE applies, but breaks down dramatically at large Bjorken x.




Friday 19th April (2002)Friday 19th April 

Friday 19th April


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

The future of Event Generation
Leif Lonnblad
(Lund)
I will discuss some aspects of the future of HEP event generator programs for the LHC era, both from the point of view of software development and of the underlying physics modeling. The first part of the the talk will describe the project to completely rewrite the Lund family of event generators in C++ and the related project of rewriting the Herwig generator. In the second part I will describe a new algorithm for combining "exact" fixed order matrix element generation of few-parton final states with parton shower evolution to all orders.




Thursday 25th April (2002)Thursday 25th April 

Thursday 25th April


15:30
NIKHEF event

Afscheid Piet Louwrier
Afscheid Piet Louwrier




Friday 26th April (2002)Friday 26th April 

Friday 26th April


11:15H331/Z011
Landelijk Seminarium Theoretische HEF

Phenomenological Aspects of D-branes

Full agenda Landelijk Seminarium THEF
Fernando Quevedo
(Cambridge)
D-branes have been playing a very important role on recent developments in string theory. They also provide a new avenue towards the phenomenological implications of the theory. I will discuss how the standard model can be embedded in D-branes and the possible implications this may have for low energy physics and cosmology




Friday 3rd May (2002)Friday 3th May 

Friday 3th May


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

The Nijmegen NAHSA and LOFAR projects (link)
Charles Timmermans
(Nijmegen)
NAHSA (Nijmegen Area High School Array) is a newly proposed instrument for the detection of high energetic cosmic showers. Its scientific purpose is to measure the highest energetic cosmic rays, and provide clues as to their origin. This task can only be fulfilled using a large area of detecton. A way to enlarge this detector in the future, could be by using the LOFAR-detector. When high energetic particles enter the atmosphere, radio signals can be detected. There is a large outreach and educational aspect to this detector as we place the individual stations at schools and try to involve high school teachers and students in this project.




Thursday 16th May (2002)Thursday 16th May 

Thursday 16th May


15:30UvA
Algemeen N&S Colloquium
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT Algemeen N&S Colloquium

Superconductivity out of the blue
Prof.Dr. D. van der Marel
(Univ. Groningen)
Superconductors are materials that lose their electrical resistance below a certain temperature. This phenomenon arises when electrons overcome their mutual repulsion to form pairs, which do not experience electrical resistance. BCS theory successfully describes the behaviour of many superconductors, in which electrons gain the energy they need to pair up through interactions with vibrations of the crystal lattice. But how electrons pair up in high-temperature - or cuprate - superconductors, which were only discovered in 1986, is subject of intensive research. We studied a high-temperature superconductor made of bismuth, strontium, calcium, copper and oxygen - known as Bi-2212 - which has a superconducting transition temperature of 88 kelvin. By analysing the light reflected from the material above and below 88 kelvin - that is, in its normal and superconducting states - we determine which frequencies of light it absorbed. The energies of these photons are related to the binding energy of the electron pairs in the superconductor. As the sample of Bi-2212 was cooled below its transition temperature, we observe that the light reflected from it shifted towards higher frequencies and away from the infrared region of the spectrum. This means that the material absorbs more infrared light when it is in its superconducting state. This suggests that the electrons in Bi-2212 pair up because they have the lowest kinetic energy in this arrangement. This could lead to a stable superconducting state even if the electrostatic repulsion between two electrons tends to push them apart Apparently the BCS mechanism is not the only way to achieve superconductivity.




Friday 17th May (2002)Friday 17th May 

Friday 17th May


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

The 45 years of muon g-2
Francis Farley
(University of Yale - New Haven)
In 1957, in a footnote to their famous paper on muon polarisation, Garwin Lederman and Weinrich estimated the value of g from the absence of visible g-2 precession. We follow the story since then, three experiments at CERN and the new BNL measurement at 1.3 ppm disagreeing with theory by 2.6 standard deviations. In November 2001 the Marseille group corrected the theory reducing the discrepancy to 1.6 standard deviations. The talk will include a short video from CERN (1968).




Friday 24th May (2002)Friday 24th May 

Friday 24th May


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

Large Scale Superconducting Magnets for Physics Research, LHC, ATLAS and ITER
Herman ten Kate
(CERN)
The frontiers of research in nuclear physics (HEP, Plasma fusion and NMR) require the fruits of superconducting magnet development. Discovery machines in high energy physics require proton collisions at very high energy and these are only feasible by using superconducting magnets. The LHC machine including the detectors like ATLAS are under construction and will come into operation within the next 5 years. Next steps are under discussion like LHC upgrades (in 10-15 years). Even new machines of 100 to 200 TeV level are possible (in 15-20 years) provided the magnet technology can be further developed. Both alternatives (few high field quadrupoles or a complete new machine) require reliable Nb3Sn magnet technology. Today 11-13 T class Nb3Sn accelerator magnets can in principle be made but it takes typically 20 year time (see LHC) to come to an industrial production. So we need to start today and the customer (you) has to ask for it. The status of the magnet production in the LHC machine will be highlighted. In more detail the ATLAS Detector Magnet System will be presented and briefly the challenges in fusion magnets for ITER will be addressed.




Monday 27th May (2002)Monday 27th May 

Monday 27th May


16:00Nijmegen
HEFIN
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT HEFIN

Comparing Gluon and Quark Jets at LEP
Klaus Hamacher
(Bergische Univ. Wuppertal)
Progress in the understanding of the properties of jets originating from gluons has been obtained at LEP. This talk summarises important results centering on the measurements of the DELPHI Collaboration. First the motivations for the measurements based on the QCD lagrangian are given as well as the experimental strategies. After comparing the general properties of gluon and quark jets briefly a more detailed review of colour coherence, scaling violations of the fragmentation function and the energy evolution of the hadron multiplicity will follow. Finally identified particle production, especially the observed excess of baryon production in gluon jets will be discussed briefly.
12:00UU
SAP
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT SAP

Test of Silicon Strip Detectors with an infrared laser
A. Sokolov
(UU)




Friday 31st May (2002)Friday 31th May 

Friday 31th May


13:30Z011
NIKHEF event

Afscheid Rene van Dantzig (symposium + receptie)
Afscheid Rene van Dantzig (symposium + receptie)
Vanaf 13.30 symposium:

Ben Bakker (VU) Van weinig nucleonen tot veel quarks

Miron Livny (Univ. Wisconsin) From Condor Flocks to Data Grids

Erik Heijne (CERN) Halfgeleider detectoren in de Lage Landen

Paolo Strolin (Univ. Napels) Could we live without Neutrino's

Vanaf 16.30 receptie in WCW bedrijfsrestaurant




Friday 7th June (2002)Friday 7th June 

Friday 7th June


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

Soft and hard QCD tests with e+e- Annihilation data (link)
Stefan Kluth
(MPI Munich)
Hadron production in e+e- annihilation is an ideal laboratory for studies of QCD. Tests of perturbative QCD predictions with e+e- annihilation data recorded at sqrt(s)= 14 GeV to the highest LEP 2 energies are reviewed. Recent theoretical progress in the understanding of hadronisation corrections is briefly explained and comparisons with the data are discussed. An extension of this method leads to a measurement of the QCD gauge structure complementary to traditional analysis of 4-jet final states.




Friday 14th June (2002)Friday 14th June 

Friday 14th June


09:00KVI Groningen
NIKHEF event

FOM Sportdag
FOM Sportdag




Wednesday 19th June (2002)Wednesday 19th June 

Wednesday 19th June


12:00NIKHEF
NIKHEF event

Haringfeest
Haringfeest




Friday 21st June (2002)Friday 21th June 

Friday 21th June


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

Summary of DIS2002
E Tassi
(Nikhef)
We review the main experimental results presented at the X International Workshop on Deep Inelastic Scattering. Discussed Physics topics will include: Structure functions and parton distribution functions, tests of pQCD, diffraction, spin physics as well as future experimental opportunities.




Thursday 27th June (2002)Thursday 27th June 

Thursday 27th June


15:30UvA
Algemeen Natuur- en Sterrenkunde
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT Algemeen Natuur- en Sterrenkunde

Random Lasers
Prof.Dr. Ad Lagendijk
(Twente)
The presentation will discuss a new type of lasers. When you think of a laser usually you think of some active material in a cavity between two highly polished and precisely aligned mirrors. In this talk lasers will be described in which the cavity is replaced by much more mundane objects like paper, vegetables or grains of rice. The basic ingredient of these random lasers is that mirrors can be replaced by multiple scattering of random media. Generalizing the concept of a random laser I will come with a new laser that I claim will be the most fundamental laser.




Friday 28th June (2002)Friday 28th June 

Friday 28th June


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

Heavy-ion physics at RHIC
R Snellings
(Nikhef)




Tuesday 23rd July (2002)Tuesday 23th July 

Tuesday 23th July


13:30H331
NIKHEF SEMINAR

A Potpourri of Physics
Dr. J. Huston
(Michigan State University)




Monday 19th August (2002)Monday 19th August 

Monday 19th August


11:15H331
NIKHEF event

Vaders verjaardag!
Vaders verjaardag!




Friday 6th September (2002)Friday 6th September 

Friday 6th September


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

FOM: Accenten voor 2002/2003
Hans Chang
(FOM)




Tuesday 17th September (2002)Tuesday 17th September 

Tuesday 17th September


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

The JLAB program - with emphasis on meson spectroscopy (link)
M Nozar
( JLAB)
This talk will cover an overview of Jefferson Laboratory, its current status and its future plans. The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at the lab (CEBAF) will be introduced and the ongoing physics programs at the three experimental halls will briefly be discussed. The physics driving the upgrade of the accelerator as well as the addition of another experimental hall will be covered. Emphasis will be put on the Meson Spectroscopy program at Hall B of Jlab, with an introduction on Mesons beyond the quark model. We present the motivation behind the search for these states, the strategies and the analysis techniques involved in extracting such states. Some recent hadro- and photo-production results will be presented. (This talk has been moved from Friday September 13th to Tuesday September 17th)




Thursday 19th September (2002)Thursday 19th September 

Thursday 19th September


14:00H220
NIKHEF event

OPP
OPP
15:30Euclides, UvA
Algemeen Natuur- en Sterrenkunde
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT Algemeen Natuur- en Sterrenkunde

Quantum shot noise (link)
C.W.J. Beenakker
(univ. Leiden)
"The noise is the signal" is a saying of Rolf Landauer, one of the founding fathers of mesoscopic physics. What he meant is that fluctuations in time of the electrical current may actually contain physical information that is not present in the time averaged signal. At zero temperature the current fluctuations arise from the discreteness of the electrical charge, and are therefore known as "shot noise". The first observation of shot noise goes back to Schottky's 1918 work on vacuum diodes, where it could be understood entirely in terms of classical mechanics. In the last few years it has become possible to extract information from shot noise on the nanometer scale, where classical mechanics breaks down. This talk presents an overview of the recent developments, with an emphasis on the new physical concepts introduced to understand quantum shot noise. Of particular interest is the conceptual parallel beween electronic and photonic noise, which has provided for a fruitful link between the fields of quantum optics and mesoscopic physics.




Friday 20th September (2002)Friday 20th September 

Friday 20th September


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

Extra Dimensions and Quantum Gravity at the LHC
G Giudice
(CERN)
Theories with extra spatial dimensions and with a characteristic quantum-gravity scale close to the weak scale are motivated by attempts to understand the hierarchy between the Planck and Fermi lengths. I will review the status of such theories and discuss their implications for future experiments at the LHC. In particular, I will demonstrate how certain experimental searches can identify the gravitational nature of the new interactions.




Friday 27th September (2002)Friday 27th September 

Friday 27th September


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

Physics at Hermes: Present and Future (link)
D Ryckbosch
(University of Gent)
The HERMES experiment has been operational at the HERA accelerator of DESY since 1995. Recently it started its Run-II which focusses on issues like the quark transversity distribution and generalized parton distribution functions. The quark helicity distribution g_1 has by now been measured with reasonable accuracy. It essentially describes the probability to find a longitudinally polarized quark in a longitudinally polarized nucleon. Virtually nothing is known, however, about the transverse spin structure of the nucleon. First data from HERMES indicate that this is also accessible through measurements of single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive DIS reactions. A first determination of the transversity is the prime objective of HERMES for the next years. Another development at HERMES that triggered quite some excitement was the clear observation of exclusive reactions, in particular Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS). Such reactions are described in terms of a new class of functions: Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), which promise to extend our understanding of the parton structure of the nucleon significantly. HERMES is presently constructing a new detector, the Recoil Detector, that will enable an unprecedented accuracy in the determination of exclusive reactions. The physics case for the next phases in the HERMES running will be presented and an overview of the challenges ahead for the experiment will be given.




Tuesday 1st October (2002)Tuesday 1th October 

Tuesday 1th October


09:00NIKHEF
NIKHEF event

Dartcompetitie
Dartcompetitie
Preciese datum en tijd nog nader te bepalen




Friday 4th October (2002)Friday 4th October 

Friday 4th October


11:15H331/Z011
Landelijk Seminarium Theoretische HEF

Space-time from nothing

Full agenda Landelijk Seminarium THEF
Renate Loll (Utrecht)
(Utrecht University)
We still lack a consistent quantum description of how the fundamental geometric degrees of freedom of space-time interact among themselves and with other matter excitations at the very smallest length scales. Such a theory of quantum gravity would provide a microdescription of space-time geometry and explain at the same time why at large distances the universe is well described by classical general relativity. I will decribe recent attempts to construct a non-perturbative theory of quantum gravity whose formulation does not distinguish any particular metric background structure from the outset, and where "quantum space-time" emerges only as a solution of the quantum dynamics of geometry. The emphasis in this talk will be on the physical ideas rather than on the technical details.




Wednesday 9th October (2002)Wednesday 9th October 

Wednesday 9th October


16:00H320
NIKHEF SEMINAR

How to get sensible scalars
N. Hari Dass




Thursday 10th October (2002)Thursday 10th October 

Thursday 10th October


14:00H220
NIKHEF SEMINAR

String techniques for the computation of scattering amplitudes in field theory
Lorenzo Magnea
(Torino University)




Friday 11th October (2002)Friday 11th October 

Friday 11th October


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

Advances in semiconductor detectors for particle tracking in extreme radiation environments (link)
Cinzia da Via
(Brunel University)
In the future high luminosity Hadron Colliders such as the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) presently under construction at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) in Geneva, the semiconductor detectors close to the beam interaction point will be exposed to very high fluences (>10^15 particle /cm^2) during their life span. Such detectors are key to the disentanglement of important decay events and it is vital to guarantee a homogeneous reliable performance during their operation. Parameters like charge collection efficiency (CCE), signal to noise ratio (S/N) and speed will be discussed. Limitations of present technologies will be analysed and future strategies explored. Results obtained by using alternative detector designs, such as 3D geometries, material engineering by oxygen diffusion and unconventional operational conditions will be presented.




Friday 18th October (2002)Friday 18th October 

Friday 18th October


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

Status of Athena and Low-Energy Anti-Proton Physics at CERN
Dirk Peter van der Werf
(University of Wales, Swansea)




Sunday 20th October (2002)Sunday 20th October 

Sunday 20th October


12:00WCW
NIKHEF event

Open Dag 2002
Open Dag 2002




Friday 25th October (2002)Friday 25th October 

Friday 25th October


10:00Lunteren
NIKHEF event

NNV najaarsvergadering
NNV najaarsvergadering




Thursday 31st October (2002)Thursday 31th October 

Thursday 31th October


16:00Spectrum
NIKHEF event

Wijnfeest
Wijnfeest




Friday 1st November (2002)Friday 1th November 

Friday 1th November


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

AliRoot -- the ALICE simulation and reconstruction framework (link)
Fons Rademakers
(CERN)
About 3 years ago the ALICE collaboration finished the transition from Fortran to C++. By choosing the ROOT system as base for the experiment software it was possible to build the first version of the ALICE simulation and reconstruction framework, AliRoot, in under 6 months. The structure of AliRoot and its use of ROOT will be discussed, notably the use of ROOT I/O, tasks, folders, scripting, graphics, etc. Also an overview of the ALICE distributed processing and grid software, PROOF and AliEn, will be given.




Friday 15th November (2002)Friday 15th November 

Friday 15th November


14:00H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

The Planck mission: scientific objectives and technical capabilities (link)
Rene Laureijs
(ESA Noordwijk)
Planck is the third Medium-Sized Mission of ESA's Horizon 2000 Scientific Programme. It is designed to image the anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) over the whole sky, with unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution. Planck will provide a major source of information relevant to several cosmological and astrophysical issues, such as testing theories of the early universe and the origin of cosmic structure. In my presentation I will explain the implications of a determination of the anisotropies in the cosmic background at different angular scales. The ability to measure to high accuracy the angular power spectrum of the CMB fluctuations will allow the determination of fundamental cosmological parameters such as the density parameter ("Omega nought") and the Hubble constant ("H nought"), with an uncertainty of order a few percent. These considerations have driven the design of the mission including the on-board experiments. An overview of the Planck mission will be presented, its scientific objectives, the key elements of its technical design, and its current status. Since the Planck mission has one principal scientific objective, the science part of the mission is a collaboration of several hundred scientists grouped in consortia similar to a large (particle) physics experiment. ------------------------------------------------------------------- Note the unusual starting time of the colloquium. This in order to allow everybody to attend the promotion in the morning.




Thursday 21st November (2002)Thursday 21th November 

Thursday 21th November


11:15?
General colloquium Physics and Astronomy, University of Amsterdam
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT General colloquium Physics and Astronomy, University of Amsterdam

The Search For the Quark-Gluon-Plasma at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider
ThPeitzmann
(University of Utrecht)
Since 1986 collisions of ultra-relativistic heavy ions have been studied to search for a phase transition in strongly interacting matter to the quark-gluon-plasma. After many years of research at the CERN SPS the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider in Brookhaven is providing still higher energy beams since 2000 and has started a new era of quark-gluon-plasma research. The current status of this research program will be discussed and recent results from the RHIC experiments will be presented. I will particularly discuss the role of hard scattering and jet production.




Friday 22nd November (2002)Friday 22th November 

Friday 22th November


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

First evidence for neutrinoless double beta decay -- and implications
H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus
(Max Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik Heiderberg)
Double beta decay is one of the rarest nuclear decay modes and is under investigation already for more than sixty years. The neutrinoless mode is of particular interest since it would violate lepton number and its occurrence would determine the neutrino to be a Majorana particle. Double beta decay experiments are indispensable to solve the structure of the neutrino mass matrix. They further probe, complementary to high energy colliders, other fields of beyond standard model physics. The present experimental status is reviewed including the recent evidence for the neutrinoless decay mode from the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment. Implications and future perspectives are discussed.




Monday 25th November (2002)Monday 25th November 

Monday 25th November


16:15Utrecht
NIKHEF event

Oratie Eric Laenen
Oratie Eric Laenen




Wednesday 27th November (2002)Wednesday 27th November 

Wednesday 27th November


15:00PIMU hal
NIKHEF event

LHCb cleanroomparty
LHCb cleanroomparty




Friday 29th November (2002)Friday 29th November 

Friday 29th November


11:15H331/Z011
Landelijk Seminarium Theoretische HEF

Testing string theory in accelerators?

Full agenda Landelijk Seminarium THEF
Ignatios Antoniadis
(CERN)
A theory with such a mathematical beauty cannot be wrong: this was one of the main arguments in favor of string theory, which unifies all known physical theories of fundamental interactions in a single coherent description of the universe. But no one has ever observed strings, not even indirectly, neither the space of extra dimensions where they live. However, there are good reasons to believe that the ``hidden" dimensions of string theory may be much larger than what we thought in the past and they become within experimental reach in the near future, together with the strings themselves. In my talk, I will give an elementary introduction of this framework and describe the main experimental predictions.




Wednesday 4th December (2002)Wednesday 4th December 

Wednesday 4th December


09:00NIKHEF
NIKHEF event

Verkiezingen NOR
Verkiezingen NOR
Reguliere verkiezingen nieuwe NIKHEF Ondernemingsraad




Thursday 5th December (2002)Thursday 5th December 

Thursday 5th December


10:00centrale NIKHEF hal
NIKHEF event

Sinterklaaskoffie
Sinterklaaskoffie
De Sinterklaaskoffie wordt aangeboden door de NIKHEF Personeelsvereniging




Friday 6th December (2002)Friday 6th December 

Friday 6th December


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

Modified Newtonian dynamics as an alternative to dark matter. (link)
Prof R. H. Sanders
(Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Groningen)
Modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) is an empirically- motivated modification of Newtonian gravity or inertia suggested by Milgrom as an alternative to the widespread existence of cosmic dark matter. The basic idea is that at accelerations below about 1 angstrom per second squared, the effective gravitational acceleration approaches a specific non-Newtonian form. Over the past 20 years an impressive body of astronomical evidence in support of this idea has emerged. Here I review this evidence, discuss the possible physical basis for an acceleration-based modification of Newtonian dynamics, and comment upon likely cosmological consequences.




Thursday 12th December (2002)Thursday 12th December 

Thursday 12th December


15:30UvA
Algemeen Natuur- en Sterrenkunde
EXTERN COLLOQUIUM AT Algemeen Natuur- en Sterrenkunde

Trillions of quantum dots, Fingerprints, Nanolithography with diblock copolymers and Annealing of striped phases.
Prof.Dr. Paul M. Chaikin
(Princeton University)
We have been using diblock copolymers as a new way to make ultradense patterns which cover wide areas on a variety of inorganic substrates. The feature sizes are determined by the length of the polymers and can range from ~5 to 50 nm.The diblock copolymers form lamellar, cylindrical (hexagonal cross-section), and spherical (BCC) phases in bulk. We use monolayer films to make templates to transfer these patterns to metals, semiconductors etc. For example we cover a three inch wafer with ~ 3 trillion posts, holes, etc. spaced by ~ 25nm, to make quantum dots (for semiconductor lasers), metal particles and other structures. In trying to understand how the polymer patterns order we have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image the cylindrical phase which lies flat on a substrate. The patterns look like fingerprints and Benard rolls and the coarsening (annealing) law we observe is t^(1/4) as in previous studies of these striped phases. This law remained unexplained for decades. However, we made time lapse AFM movies which show that the annealing dynamics is governed by the attraction of disclination PAIRS, quadrupoles, rather than simple +/- annihilation. This directly provides an explanation for the alignment of the striped patterns as a function of time. Thus these systems, while aimed at technological and fundamental electronic applications are also ideal materials for studying the dynamics of ordering.




Friday 13th December (2002)Friday 13th December 

Friday 13th December


11:15H331
NIKHEF COLLOQUIUM

Unification scale physics (link)
Prof. Dr. Wim de Boer
(Universitaet Karlsruhe)
The strong, electromagnetic and weak forces all become equally strong at the unification scale, as is apparent from the unification of the coupling constants, if the radiative corrections from the supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model are considered. Supersymmetry can only be realised in nature by doubling the Standard Model Particle Spectrum. None of these supersymmetric partners have been discovered sofar, but their impact on electroweak observables will be discussed. The lightest supersymmetric partner is a good candidate for dark matter. If the dark matter is indeed of a supersymmetric origin, their annihilation into energetic fermion-antifermion pairs can be detected by anomalous antimatter production in the universe. An indication for anomalous positron production was found by balloon experiments. A fit to this balloon data in the framework of the supergravity inspired Minimal Supersymmetric Model and corresponding predictions for future space experiments will be given.




Thursday 19th December (2002)Thursday 19th December 

Thursday 19th December


16:00Verrassing
NIKHEF event

Kerstdiner
Kerstdiner

This agenda is generated automatically from an XML source (with corresponding DTD) using a Python script at Monday, 13th Jan (2003) 11:08:37 hrs.
Please forward any errata, questions or remarks to Stan Bentvelsen or Nigel Hessey